Beni Koulla is located about two hours from Chefchaouen, in the Rif Mountains of Morocco. The community is part of a larger commune, with a focus on agriculture. The hills surrounding the village are covered in olive trees and herds of sheep.

Beni Koulla is located about two hours from Chefchaouen, in the Rif Mountains of Morocco. The community is part of a larger commune, with a focus on agriculture. The hills surrounding the village are covered in olive trees and herds of sheep.

  Salma, 10, is Nora's second oldest daughter. She often helps her mother with household chores, and mimicked her behavior, such as offering food, giving up her seat for guests, and tending to the smaller children of the village.

Salma, 10, is Nora's second oldest daughter. She often helps her mother with household chores, and mimicked her behavior, such as offering food, giving up her seat for guests, and tending to the smaller children of the village.

  Beni Koulla resident Fatima milks one of several cows that belong to Beni Koulla's largest home. The gloomy weather coupled with the early morning chill caused the milk to steam as it hit the colorful plastic buckets. She will continue her work for several more hours before she breaks for lunch.

Beni Koulla resident Fatima milks one of several cows that belong to Beni Koulla's largest home. The gloomy weather coupled with the early morning chill caused the milk to steam as it hit the colorful plastic buckets. She will continue her work for several more hours before she breaks for lunch.

  Anas, 7, and Najat, 3, stand with one of the several donkeys that Najat’s family owns. Beni Koulla relies on donkeys for transporting crops from one part of the commune to the other.

Anas, 7, and Najat, 3, stand with one of the several donkeys that Najat’s family owns. Beni Koulla relies on donkeys for transporting crops from one part of the commune to the other.

  Farah, 8, is Hana's oldest child. She often stayed in her yard, waiting to be invited to play in other children's activities. Here, she poses for a photograph as her mother harvest Moroccan spinach.

Farah, 8, is Hana's oldest child. She often stayed in her yard, waiting to be invited to play in other children's activities. Here, she poses for a photograph as her mother harvest Moroccan spinach.

  Othmane, 5, is the youngest child of Hana. Most days, he walks about 25 minutes with other village children to go to the primary school down the road. Today is Sunday, so he can stay around his mother and play with his neighbors.

Othmane, 5, is the youngest child of Hana. Most days, he walks about 25 minutes with other village children to go to the primary school down the road. Today is Sunday, so he can stay around his mother and play with his neighbors.

  Hana and Fatima gather "bakoula," also known as Moroccan spinach, in the back yard of their Beni Koulla homes. They hurry to collect loads of the plant before the light fades and the last call to prayer is announced from the village mosque.

Hana and Fatima gather "bakoula," also known as Moroccan spinach, in the back yard of their Beni Koulla homes. They hurry to collect loads of the plant before the light fades and the last call to prayer is announced from the village mosque.

  Ismail, Abdullah Amil’s son, sits with his grandmother Walida in the open corridors of their Beni Koulla home. In traditional Moroccan families, generations live together and grandmothers often take care of their grandchildren.

Ismail, Abdullah Amil’s son, sits with his grandmother Walida in the open corridors of their Beni Koulla home. In traditional Moroccan families, generations live together and grandmothers often take care of their grandchildren.

  Rain or shine, the residents of the Beni Koulla must do their daily chores and the children must attend school. Because Morocco has seen a year of remarkable drought, the heavy rainfall is welcomed by the villagers with a "hamdoulah"

Rain or shine, the residents of the Beni Koulla must do their daily chores and the children must attend school. Because Morocco has seen a year of remarkable drought, the heavy rainfall is welcomed by the villagers with a "hamdoulah"

  The sheep belonging to the Amil family wait patiently to be let out to pasture. The livestock live in harmony within the homes in Beni Koulla and are often seen roaming the courtyard and hallways.

The sheep belonging to the Amil family wait patiently to be let out to pasture. The livestock live in harmony within the homes in Beni Koulla and are often seen roaming the courtyard and hallways.

  Women of the village make and serve food for the family in a traditional Moroccan home. Here, a young woman named Esme goes through freshly made couscous by hand, in order to break up the clumps in a process called "feteel."

Women of the village make and serve food for the family in a traditional Moroccan home. Here, a young woman named Esme goes through freshly made couscous by hand, in order to break up the clumps in a process called "feteel."

Feldman_7.jpg
  Najat, 3, sorts through wheat with one hand and clutches colored clay with the other. Her mother Wahfeh sits next to her. The women in Beni Koulla spend multiple hours picking the bad kernels out of the harvest to make huge loaves of bread in their community ovens.

Najat, 3, sorts through wheat with one hand and clutches colored clay with the other. Her mother Wahfeh sits next to her. The women in Beni Koulla spend multiple hours picking the bad kernels out of the harvest to make huge loaves of bread in their community ovens.

  Houssam, a younger resident of Beni Koulla, plays in the tall wheat plants surrounding the village. Wheat is an important part of Morocco's agricultural sector, and bread is served with almost every meal.

Houssam, a younger resident of Beni Koulla, plays in the tall wheat plants surrounding the village. Wheat is an important part of Morocco's agricultural sector, and bread is served with almost every meal.

_14A7772.jpg
 Beni Koulla is located about two hours from Chefchaouen, in the Rif Mountains of Morocco. The community is part of a larger commune, with a focus on agriculture. The hills surrounding the village are covered in olive trees and herds of sheep.
  Salma, 10, is Nora's second oldest daughter. She often helps her mother with household chores, and mimicked her behavior, such as offering food, giving up her seat for guests, and tending to the smaller children of the village.
  Beni Koulla resident Fatima milks one of several cows that belong to Beni Koulla's largest home. The gloomy weather coupled with the early morning chill caused the milk to steam as it hit the colorful plastic buckets. She will continue her work for several more hours before she breaks for lunch.
  Anas, 7, and Najat, 3, stand with one of the several donkeys that Najat’s family owns. Beni Koulla relies on donkeys for transporting crops from one part of the commune to the other.
  Farah, 8, is Hana's oldest child. She often stayed in her yard, waiting to be invited to play in other children's activities. Here, she poses for a photograph as her mother harvest Moroccan spinach.
  Othmane, 5, is the youngest child of Hana. Most days, he walks about 25 minutes with other village children to go to the primary school down the road. Today is Sunday, so he can stay around his mother and play with his neighbors.
  Hana and Fatima gather "bakoula," also known as Moroccan spinach, in the back yard of their Beni Koulla homes. They hurry to collect loads of the plant before the light fades and the last call to prayer is announced from the village mosque.
  Ismail, Abdullah Amil’s son, sits with his grandmother Walida in the open corridors of their Beni Koulla home. In traditional Moroccan families, generations live together and grandmothers often take care of their grandchildren.
  Rain or shine, the residents of the Beni Koulla must do their daily chores and the children must attend school. Because Morocco has seen a year of remarkable drought, the heavy rainfall is welcomed by the villagers with a "hamdoulah"
  The sheep belonging to the Amil family wait patiently to be let out to pasture. The livestock live in harmony within the homes in Beni Koulla and are often seen roaming the courtyard and hallways.
  Women of the village make and serve food for the family in a traditional Moroccan home. Here, a young woman named Esme goes through freshly made couscous by hand, in order to break up the clumps in a process called "feteel."
Feldman_7.jpg
  Najat, 3, sorts through wheat with one hand and clutches colored clay with the other. Her mother Wahfeh sits next to her. The women in Beni Koulla spend multiple hours picking the bad kernels out of the harvest to make huge loaves of bread in their community ovens.
  Houssam, a younger resident of Beni Koulla, plays in the tall wheat plants surrounding the village. Wheat is an important part of Morocco's agricultural sector, and bread is served with almost every meal.
_14A7772.jpg

Beni Koulla is located about two hours from Chefchaouen, in the Rif Mountains of Morocco. The community is part of a larger commune, with a focus on agriculture. The hills surrounding the village are covered in olive trees and herds of sheep.

Salma, 10, is Nora's second oldest daughter. She often helps her mother with household chores, and mimicked her behavior, such as offering food, giving up her seat for guests, and tending to the smaller children of the village.

Beni Koulla resident Fatima milks one of several cows that belong to Beni Koulla's largest home. The gloomy weather coupled with the early morning chill caused the milk to steam as it hit the colorful plastic buckets. She will continue her work for several more hours before she breaks for lunch.

Anas, 7, and Najat, 3, stand with one of the several donkeys that Najat’s family owns. Beni Koulla relies on donkeys for transporting crops from one part of the commune to the other.

Farah, 8, is Hana's oldest child. She often stayed in her yard, waiting to be invited to play in other children's activities. Here, she poses for a photograph as her mother harvest Moroccan spinach.

Othmane, 5, is the youngest child of Hana. Most days, he walks about 25 minutes with other village children to go to the primary school down the road. Today is Sunday, so he can stay around his mother and play with his neighbors.

Hana and Fatima gather "bakoula," also known as Moroccan spinach, in the back yard of their Beni Koulla homes. They hurry to collect loads of the plant before the light fades and the last call to prayer is announced from the village mosque.

Ismail, Abdullah Amil’s son, sits with his grandmother Walida in the open corridors of their Beni Koulla home. In traditional Moroccan families, generations live together and grandmothers often take care of their grandchildren.

Rain or shine, the residents of the Beni Koulla must do their daily chores and the children must attend school. Because Morocco has seen a year of remarkable drought, the heavy rainfall is welcomed by the villagers with a "hamdoulah"

The sheep belonging to the Amil family wait patiently to be let out to pasture. The livestock live in harmony within the homes in Beni Koulla and are often seen roaming the courtyard and hallways.

Women of the village make and serve food for the family in a traditional Moroccan home. Here, a young woman named Esme goes through freshly made couscous by hand, in order to break up the clumps in a process called "feteel."

Najat, 3, sorts through wheat with one hand and clutches colored clay with the other. Her mother Wahfeh sits next to her. The women in Beni Koulla spend multiple hours picking the bad kernels out of the harvest to make huge loaves of bread in their community ovens.

Houssam, a younger resident of Beni Koulla, plays in the tall wheat plants surrounding the village. Wheat is an important part of Morocco's agricultural sector, and bread is served with almost every meal.

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